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CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

D&O Loans: California Section 315 Versus Sarbanes-Oxley Section 402

Although both Section 315 of the California Corporations Code and Section 402 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act purport to ban loans to directors and officers, there are significant differences between these statutes.  Below is a precis of some of the key differences. Companies covered.  Section 315 applies to corporations.  The California General Corporation Law (GCL) defines “corporation” as only a…

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California’s D&O Loan Ban And Advancement Of Expenses

Yesterday’s post outlined the general scope of the ban on loans to directors and officers found in Section 315 of the California Corporations Code.  Because Section 315 doesn’t define “loan”, it may not always be clear whether an arrangement is a verboten loan.  Fortunately, no time need be wasted on the question of routine travel and…

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California’s Ban On Loans To Directors And Officers

California banned loans to directors and officers decades before Congress thought of doing so as part of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.  Current Corporations Code Section 315 prohibits corporations (defined in Section 162) from making loans of money or property to, or guaranteeing the obligations of, any director or officer of the corporation or its parent.  However, the…

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Restatements Reported To California Board On Downward Trend Overall

On June 30, 2002, President Bush signed the Sarbanes-Oxley Act into law (for a trip down memory lane, you can read Broc Romanek’s post reporting that momentous event here).  Less than a month later, Governor Gray Davis signed AB 270 (Correa) into law.  AB 270, one of several California laws enacted in the wake of…

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U.S. Supreme Court Decides Fate of Legislative Platypus

This morning, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion concerning the constitutionality of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB). The Court held that the dual for-cause limitations on removal of PCAOB members contravene the U.S. Constitution’s principle of separation of powers.  (See my article in which I concluded “This violates Article II of the…

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