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CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

Court Rules LLC Members May Be “Fiduciaries In Fact”

U.S. District Court Judge Tena Campbell’s ruling in Strong v. Cochran, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 170073, is a reminder that sometimes what you do matters more than what you say.  The case involved claims by the liquidating trustee for a failed real estate firm, Castle Arch Real Estate Investment Company, LLC, a California limited liability company (“CAREIC”). …

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Filing Statements Of Information Online

Last June, the California Secretary of State’s office announced bizfile California, which it described as “a new online portal to help businesses file, search, and order business records quickly and conveniently from one webpage”.  Bizfile California currently permits limited liability companies to file electronically the following: Initial LLC Statement of Information Required Periodic LLC Statement…

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California Court Green Lights Reverse Veil Piercing Of Delaware LLC

Courts historically have applied the alter ego doctrine to “pierce the corporate veil” so that a shareholder may be held liable for the debts or conduct of the corporation.  California has extended the possibility of alter ego liability to members of California limited liability companies: A member of a limited liability company shall be subject to…

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Court Declines To Impose Alter Ego Liability On LLC’s President

In general, the debts, obligations, or other liabilities of a California limited liability company do not become the debts, obligations, or other liabilities of a member or manager solely by reason of the member acting as a member or manager acting as a manager for the LLC.  Cal. Corp. Code § 17703.04(a).  An important exception to this…

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Fictitious Name Use Fails To Engender Standing Or Jurisdictional Issue

California Code of Civil Procedure Section 367 requires that every action must be prosecuted in the name of the real party of interest.  What happens when a plaintiff sues under a fictitious business name of a dissolved foreign limited liability company?  Yesterday, the Court of Appeal answered that question in The Rossdale Group, LLC v.…

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The Limited Liability Company Agreement That Has No Name

Practitioners under California’s Revised Uniform Limited Liability Company Act will be familiar with the concept of an “operating agreement” (Cal. Corp. Code § 17701.02(s)).  Indeed, I expect that nearly every LLC formed under the CARULLCA has, or will have, some form of operating agreement.  Practitioners, however, may be unaware that the CARULLCA also contemplates the existence of…

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Alter Ego and the Nevada LLC

California’s version of the Revised Uniform Limited Liability Company Act expressly subjects members to potential alter ego liability:  A member of a limited liability company shall be subject to liability under the common law governing alter ego liability, and shall also be personally liable under a judgment of a court or for any debt, obligation,…

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O Frabjous Day! Court Holds Passive Member Is Not “Doing Business”

The State of California imposes its franchise tax on every corporation (other than a bank, financial corporation or exempt corporation) that is “doing business” in California.  Cal. Rev. & Tax Code § 23151.  This tax is imposed without regard to whether the corporation is incorporated in California.  This makes the name of the tax somewhat misleading…

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One More Thing That A Limited Liability Company May Not Be Able To Do

California law does not permit limited liability companies to render a variety of professional services.  See,  Contractors Do It, PIs Do It; Why Not Real Estate Brokers?  To add insult to injury, the California General Corporation Law does not explicitly authorize LLCs to act as incorporators, even while permitting a wide variety of natural and unnatural persons to…

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Contractors Do It, PIs Do It; Why Not Real Estate Brokers?

Individuals and corporations, but not limited liability companies, may be licensed as real estate brokers under the California Real Estate Law.  This is a result of a bargain reached when California’s enacted its first limited liability company law – the Beverly-Killea Act.  In order to overcome the objection of the California Trial Lawyers Association, the act proscribed…

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