Does Former Officer Have An Obligation To Turn Over Whistleblower Award?

Yesterday, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced “a whistleblower award payout between $475,000 and $575,000 to a former company officer who reported original, high-quality information about a securities fraud that resulted in an SEC enforcement action with sanctions exceeding $1 million.”  This was the SEC’s first award to a former officer because officers, directors, trustees, or

California AG Declares Whistleblower Tally A State Secret

Since 2004, the California Attorney General has been required to maintain a whistleblower hotline to receive calls from persons who have information regarding possible violations of state or federal statutes, rules, or regulations, or violations of fiduciary responsibility by a corporation or limited liability company to its shareholders, investors, or employees.  Cal. Labor Code §

Indemnification And The Circle Of Litigation

Cycle Graphic

An employee sues his employer for, among other things, violations of the California Labor Code.  The quondam employer responds with a counterclaim against its erstwhile employee claiming that to the extent it is liable, the employee is partially liable for creating that liability.  The employee responds with a reply counterclaim seeking indemnification based on Section

Law Mandates CalPERS/CalSTRS Support For Shareholder Resolutions Supporting Religious Minorities

In 1999, the legislature enacted SB 105 (Burton) which obligates CalPERS and CalSTRS to support, whenever feasible, shareholder resolutions at domestic and international corporations in which those funds have invested that are designed to encourage, among other things: Increased representation of individuals from underrepresented religious groups in the work force, including managerial, supervisory, administrative, clerical, and technical

Can Officers Contract For The Business Judgment Rule?

Yesterday, I wrote about a recent memorandum opinion by U.S. District Court Judge Dale S. Fischer that led to a jury verdict awarding nearly $169 million in damages against three former corporate officers.  Among other things, Judge Fischer ruled that the business judgment rule is not available to corporate officers under California law. Nearly four years ago, the