Did You Ever Wonder Whether “Within” Might Be A Superfluous Pleonasm?

Suppose that you hold an option that must be exercised “within 30 days prior to the expiration of the option”.  Does this mean that you must exercise the option no later than thirty days before the expiration date or that you may exercise the option at any time within the 30 days before the expiration

California Enacts Change-in-Control Benefits For Grocery Workers

Last week, Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 359 (Gonzalez) that will impose a worker retention requirement when there has been a change in ownership or control of grocery establishments.  In general, the bill will require the successor grocery employer to retain eligible grocery workers for a 90-day period.  After that period expires, the successor grocery employer will

Nevada Enacts Provisions Permitting Ratification Of Corporate Acts

Etymologically, one might view the meaning of “ratify” as to make as one had thought.  It is derived from two Latin words – ratus (the past participle of the verb meaning to think) and facere (the infinitive of the verb meaning to make).  Two years ago, Delaware added two statutes intended to facilitate ratification of corporate

California Amends Code To Authorize Worker Cooperatives

I’ve written in the past about various efforts to create a workers cooperative law here in California.  See Are Worker Cooperatives A “Sea Water Fish In A Freshwater Pond”? and In The Year 2525, If Man Is Still Alive, If Woman Can Survive, They May Find Limited Liability Worker Cooperatives.  This summer, the California legislature enacted legislation, AB

Court Poised To Decide Whether Directors Are Agents

Not quite four years ago, I wrote about whether directors are agents.  The post was prompted by then Chancellor William B. Chandler III’s assertion: This is because the board’s power – which is that of an agent’s with regard to its principal – derives from the shareholders, who are the ultimate holders of power under

California, Nevada and 38 Other States Have These, But Delaware Doesn’t

According to the National Center for State Courts, forty states, including California and Nevada, have established intermediate courts of appeal.  California’s Court of Appeal was established by a constitutional amendment adopted by the voters in November 1904.  Originally, the Court of Appeal was comprised of three districts, with the First District sitting in San Francisco,

California Reverts To Former Securities Anti-Fraud Statute

Readers of this blog will recall my chariness of a 2013 amendment to California’s basic securities anti-fraud statute.  See California Creates Complete Chaos By Rewriting Anti-Fraud Statute, But “We Are Against Fraud Aren’t We?”  Although I identified a host of issues, my fundamental concern was that by rewriting California Corporations Code Section 25401, the legislature

Section 10(b) Claim Receives a Do-Wacko-Do

So many Section 10(b) claims involve claims of misrepresentation that it easy to forget that the rule also makes it unlawful to use manipulative devices in connection with the purchase or sale of securities.  However, a recent ruling by Judge Margaret M. Morrow considered whether a plaintiff had adequately pled a claim of manipulative conduct in

Conduct Unbecoming Of An Officer And An Employee?

In proposing executive compensation recoupment rules, the Securities and Exchange Commission either overlooked or failed to recognize an important legal distinction.  The proposed rules would require national securities exchanges and national securities associations to establish listing standards requiring each issuer to develop and implement a policy providing for the recovery, under certain circumstances, of incentive-based compensation based on financial

Nevada Corporate Law: What’s Wrong With Expedition?

As someone who has been writing about Nevada corporate law for over two decades, I’ve been somewhat amused by the recent “discovery” of the Silver State as an alternative to Delaware.  Writing for The Wall Street Journal, Liz Hoffman observed that Nevada is the second most popular state after Delaware for public company incorporations.  This prompted