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CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

Another “Best Practices” May Not Be Best After All

For years, I’ve been critical of governance experts who promote “best practices” without any basis that these practices are actually effective, much less the best.  For example, the Harvard Law School’s Shareholder Rights Project undertook to push numerous companies to eliminate their staggered boards.  Two former SEC Commissioners took the Harvard SRP to task for advancing shareholder…

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Court Of Appeal Holds LLC’s Former Counsel May Represent Insider Defendants In Derivative Suit

Derivative actions can be somewhat confusing.  Although the entity is essentially the plaintiff, it is named as a defendant.  Initially, one might question why must the corporation be named as a party?  I can think of at least two reasons.  First, the litigation involves the rights of the entity directly.  Second, including the entity as a party…

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Materiality – “Shoulda, Coulda, Woulda?”

John Jenkins recently took note of this letter from the SEC’s Office of Investor Advocate commenting on a proposal by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to amend the definition of “materiality” in Concepts Statement No. 8, Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting.  That Concepts Statement currently defines “materiality” as follows: Information is material if omitting it or…

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Does Disclosure Of Results Of Internal Investigation Constitute Subject Matter Waiver?

Last Friday, I wrote about one of the docketed appeals in Wynn Resorts, Limited v. Eight Jud. Dist. Ct., 41 Nev. Adv. Op. 52 (2017).  Today’s post concerns the other docketed appeal in that case.  This appeal addressed whether disclosure of an internal investigation results in a waiver of the attorney-client privilege.  To recap, the case…

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Does Assertion Of Business Judgment Rule Waive Attorney-Client Privilege?

Nevada, like California, has codified the attorney-client privilege: A client has a privilege to refuse to disclose, and to prevent any other person from disclosing, confidential communications: Between the client or the client’s representative and the client’s lawyer or the representative of the client’s lawyer Between the client’s lawyer and the lawyer’s representative. Made for…

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Negotiating Permits?

The title of yesterday’s post may have been a bit recondite for some readers as I never directly mentioned negotiating permits in the post.  Therefore, today’s post will back up a bit and fill in some of the missing pieces. As noted yesterday, the California Corporate Securities Law prohibits offers of securities by issuers unless the…

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A Permit To Negotiate – Really?

It is sometimes forgotten that the California Corporate Securities Law of 1968 makes it unlawful to either offer or sell a security in California in an issuer transaction unless that the sale has been qualified or exempt from or not subject to qualification.  Cal. Corp. Code § 25110.  Thankfully, the CSL exempts most offers.  Today’s…

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Why Not All Purchasers Are Buyers

Modern English is partially the product of an unnatural grafting of French onto Old English.  It is for this reason that we often find two words for nearly the same thing.  Thus, we call the animal a cow  but the food beef.  The barnyard term is Old English, cu, while the table term is Old French, buef.  This should…

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Must A Broker-Dealer Be Licensed As A Personal Property Broker?

Is your California securities broker-dealer a licensed personal property broker?  Does it need to have such a license to make loans to its customers?  Anyone reading California Corporations Code Section 25217(c) would conclude that it must:  A broker-dealer licensed under this chapter making loans to its customers which are subject to the provisions of Division…

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Shares of Foreign Subsidiaries

I expect that little or no thought is given to the possible application of California’s Corporate Securities Law of 1968 when a corporation incorporates a subsidiary under the laws of a foreign country.  However, the issuance of shares to a corporate parent located in California may well involve the offer and sale of securities in California.  As…

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