It’s Time To Put A Stop To Fee-Shifting (But Not In the Way You Might Think)

The problem with “fee-shifting bylaws” starts with the name.  A better name might be “anti fee-shifting bylaws” because they end the fee shifting that otherwise applies.  Without fee-shifting bylaws, plaintiffs’ attorneys are encouraged to bet with the stockholders’ money.  This is, of course, unfair to the stockholders.  Society also suffers because the current fee-shifting regime

When A Corporation May Not Be A Corporation At All

The California General Corporation Law separately defines “corporation” and “domestic corporation”.   The definition of “domestic corporation” is straightforward, the definition of “corporation” is not.  In most cases, a corporation will also be a domestic corporation, but in some cases a “corporation” may not even be a corporation at all! A “domestic corporation” is simply a corporation formed under the laws of the State

Will Delaware’s Fee-Shifting Bylaw Bill Be A Boon To Other States?

Late last week, Senate Bill 75 was introduced in Delaware.  This bill is in part a reaction to the Delaware Supreme Court’s holding in ATP Tour, Inc. v. Deutscher Tennis Bund, 91 A.3d 554 (Del. 2014) upholding as facially valid a bylaw imposing liability for certain legal fees of the nonstock corporation on certain members who

Court Sorts Out California RULLCA Transition Muddle

Yesterday, I wrote about Kennedy v. Kennedy, 2015 Cal. App. LEXIS 329 (Apr. 20, 2015).  That post discussed the Court of Appeal’s holding that under the General Corporation Law the dismissal of a cause of action for involuntary dissolution with prejudice vitiates any right to buy out the shareholder seeking dissolution.  The plaintiff, however, also

Dismissal Of Involuntary Dissolution Action Pulls The Plug On Corporate Buy Out

Sometimes, shareholders are divided on whether a corporation should live or die.  In these cases, the California Corporations Code provides an option that allows for the continued existence of a corporation.  In any action for involuntary dissolution, or in any proceeding for voluntary dissolution initiated by the vote of shareholders representing only 50% of the voting

There Two Ways To Create An Obligation And Six Ways To Extinguish It

California defines an “obligation” as “a legal duty, by which a person is bound to do or not to do a certain thing.”  Cal. Civ. Code § 1427.  An obligation is created in one of two ways: by contract or by operation of law.  Cal. Civ. Code § 1428.  The Civil Code, however, provides six different means

Bill Would Clarify When Limited Partnership Life Begins

When does life begin for a California limited partnership?  The California Uniform Limited Partnership Act of 2008 seems to provide inconsistent answers.  The first is found in Corporations Code Section 15902.01(a). In order for a limited partnership to be formed, a certificate of limited partnership must be filed with and on a form prescribed by the Secretary

California/Delaware Corporate Law Update

If you find yourself in Los Angeles on Thursday, consider attending the Los Angeles County Bar Association’s 2015 California and Delaware Law Update Symposium & Marvin Greene Award Presentation.  Supreme Court Justice Karen Valihura “will share some of her insights from ‘the other side of the bench,’ having recently been appointed to the Delaware Supreme Court

What Exactly Does The SEC Mean By “Permit”?

The Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed rule amendments to implement Section 955 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Pub. L.  No. 111-203, 124 Stat. 1900 (July 21, 2010).  Among other things, the SEC is proposing to add a new paragraph (i) to Item 407 of Regulation S-K.  This new paragraph would require