Website Heading

CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

Calcorporatelaw.com Lands On Top 40 List!

There are lists for everything – shopping lists, “to do” lists, laundry lists, and even blog lists.  The online business school resource, bschool.com, has put together a list of the “40 Best Corporate Law Blogs” and we are pleased to have made the list, along with Broc Romanek’s and David Lynn’s Thecorporatecounsel.net, the Harvard Law…

Share on:

Happy 한글날!

Since visiting South Korea, I’ve had an interest in the Korean language.  Therefore, I’m compelled to mention that tomorrow is Hangeul Day.  Hangeul (한글) is the writing system used in Korea.  It employs syllabic blocks consisting of at least two letters (consonants and vowels).  It’s an elegant and efficient writing system and surprisingly easy to…

Share on:

Will the “Real” Directors Please Take Your Seats?

As discussed in this earlier post, the Securities and Exchange Commission’s new proxy access requirements will likely bring attention to director qualification requirements.   The California General Corporation Law does not require that a person satisfy any particular qualification requirements to hold office as a director.  The bylaws may, however, impose qualification requirements.  Cal. Corp. Code § 212(b)(4).   These qualifications…

Share on:

Legislative Session Now Ended (Almost)

Yesterday was the end of the current legislative biennium.  Under the California Constitution and legislative rules, this means that any bill not passed before today is now dead.  Cal. Cons. Art. IV, § 10(c), Legislative Joint Rule No. 61(b)(17)). As with most things legal, there are exceptions.  Article IV, Section 10(c) of the Constitution excepts…

Share on:

Supreme Court Set to Decide Constitutionality of the PCAOB

Although this blog is dedicated to California corporate and securities law topics, I couldn’t resist a post regarding this pending decision.  At the Supreme Court session this morning announcing opinions, the Chief Justice confirmed that the Court will complete its work next Monday and go into recess until the Fall term.  Among the four cases argued…

Share on: