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CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

Nevada’s Constitutional Limitation On Shareholder Liability

Article 8, Section 3 of the Nevada Constitution provides: Dues from corporations shall be secured by such means as may be prescribed by law; Provided that corporators in corporations formed under the laws of this State shall not be individually liable for the debts or liabilities of such corporation. Remarkably, the Nevada Supreme Court has…

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Is It A Breach Of Fiduciary Duty To Fail Or Refuse To Conform To Delaware’s Judicial Decisions Or Practices?

The answer to this question in Nevada may soon be an unequivocal “no”.  Last week, the Nevada Legislature unanimously passed SB 203 and sent it to Governor Brian Sandoval for signature.  Among other things, Section 2 of SB 203 declares: The directors and officers of a domestic corporation, in exercising their duties under NRS 78.138 and 78.139,…

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Alter Ego and the Nevada LLC

California’s version of the Revised Uniform Limited Liability Company Act expressly subjects members to potential alter ego liability:  A member of a limited liability company shall be subject to liability under the common law governing alter ego liability, and shall also be personally liable under a judgment of a court or for any debt, obligation,…

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Want To File A Derivative Suit? You May Soon Be Required To Read Statutes

I have been writing recently about SB 203, a bill that is now pending in the Nevada legislature.  As introduced, the bill would, among other things, require the following: In an action involving or relating to a domestic corporation that is subject to the provisions of NRS 41.520 or alleges a breach of a fiduciary duty by a director…

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Nevada Legislature Ponders Rejection Of Unocal And Revlon Standards

Thirty years ago, the Delaware Supreme Court issued two seminal opinions concerning how courts ought to review director decisionmaking in merger and acquisition transactions.  In the first case, Unocal Corporation v. Mesa Petroleum Co., 493 A.2d 946 (Del. 1985), the Supreme Court imposed a heightened standard to board responses to hostile takeover attempts.  In the second case, Revlon, Inc. v.…

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Even In Nevada, “Get It In Writing” May Not Be Far From The Mark

A recent ruling by U.S. District Court Magistrate George Foley, Jr. serves as a reminder the “get it in writing” tends to be good advice.  The case involves a casino’s attempt to enforce a $3 million gaming debt incurred by one of its patrons.  This patron executed a credit agreement but the casino allowed him…

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Nevada Legislature Mulls Codification Of The Internal Affairs Doctrine

Delaware and Nevada are each in the business of marketing their corporate laws to businesses in other states.  Thus, it should surprise no one that these states don’t appreciate it when their legal offerings are undermined by other states.  One way to protect the franchise is by embracing the “internal affairs doctrine”. The internal affairs…

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Is California “The Biggest Loser”?

I am very excited to be moderating a panel discussion this weekend at a symposium entitled Can Delaware Be Dethroned? Evaluating Delaware’s Dominance Of Corporate Law.  The symposium is being presented by the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy at UCLA’s School of Law.  My panel consists of distinguished legal scholars from around the country: Michal Barzuza…

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The Right To Dissent And Fractional Shares

I’ve devoted several posts to how California’s General Corporation Law deals with fractional shares.  Nevada’s approach to fractional shares is somewhat different.  For example, Nevada permits rounding up to a full share in all cases.  NRS 78.205(2)(b).  However, if a Nevada corporation elects to cash out or issue scrip for fractional shares, the stockholders may…

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Why Nevada Is A More Reliable Alternative To Delaware

Directors and officers cannot always base their decisions on first-hand information.  As a practical matter, they must receive and act based on information and opinions of others. The question then becomes whether a director’s or officer’s decision will be protected when it was made in reliance upon others.  Section 141(e) of the Delaware General Corporation…

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