Nevada Corporations And Virtual Stockholder Meetings

Companies typically cite cost savings and ease of access as the motivation for holding virtual stockholder meetings.  Andy D. Bryant, Chairman of the Board of Intel Corporation, for example, provided the following rationale in the company’s 2016 proxy materials: Intel has for years been a leader in the use of technology to improve and broaden

Three Considerations For Drafting A Code of Business Conduct

Although the Securities and Exchange Commission does not require that a company adopt a code of business conduct and ethics, I would be very surprised to hear of an SEC reporting company that has not adopted such a code.  Item 406 of Regulation S-K requires a reporting company to disclose whether it has “adopted a code of ethics

Donald Trump’s Contribution To Nevada Corporate Law (And My Book)

A signature block in a contract seems like a small thing, but sometimes it can lead to litigation.  When an officer signs a contract, is he signing solely as agent for the corporation or might he also be signing in his individual capacity?  In 1993, future presidential candidate Donald J. Trump faced just that question

Nevada Supreme Court Refuses To “Blue Pencil” Unreasonable Non-Compete

Nevada, unlike California, applies a reasonableness test to non-compete agreements.  Although the Nevada courts haven’t identified a specific heuristic to be followed, a covenant not to compete will be found to be unreasonable when in the absence of statutory authorization or dominant social or economic justification, “it is greater than is required for protection of the person for whose

What Is A Knowing Violation Of Law?

Nevada’s private corporation law automatically exculpates directors and officers from individual liability from individual liable to the corporation or its stockholders or creditors for any damages as a result of any act or failure to act in his or her capacity as a director or officer unless it is proven that: The director’s or officer’s

10th Circuit Highlights Difference Between Delaware And Nevada Exculpatory Statutes

Because the power to manage a corporation’s affairs rests with the board of directors, it is normally up to the board to decide whether the corporation will pursue a claim.  A shareholder who believes that the corporation should sue must therefore make a demand on the board.  If the board decides against suing, then the

He Had A Vice President’s Title And The Company Identified Him As “Management”, But He Was No Officer

Delaware attorney Francis Pileggi recently wrote about a ruling in the Court of Chancery concerning Nevada’s private corporation law.  The case, Eric Pulier v. Computer Sciences Corp., et al., C.A. No. 12005-CB, hearing (Del. Ch. May 12, 2016), arose from Computer Science Corporation’s acquisition in 2013 of Agility Platform, Inc., which was formerly known as ServiceMesh, Inc. After

Over 1,000 Nevada Business Entities To Lose Their Registered Agent

In 2007, Nevada adopted the Model Registered Agents Act.  It is currently one of 10 states to have done so (plus the District of Columbia). Nevada’s enactment of the model act may have been predestined by the fact that the chair of the committee appointed by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws

Federal Court Rules “Mere Affiliation” Is Insufficient To Establish Personal Jurisdiction

Nearly four years ago, I wrote about a Nevada Supreme Court decision holding that Nevada courts can exercise personal jurisdiction over nonresident officers and directors who directly harm the corporation.  Consipio Holding, BV v. Carlberg, 282 P.3d 751 (2012).  At the time, Nevada did not have an implied consent statute similar to Del. Code tit. 10,

Court Finds Plaintiffs Are Not Privies

Yesterday’s post noted that the plaintiff in a derivative suit is bringing claims on behalf of the corporation.  Thus, when a derivative suit is dismissed, does that dismissal have any effect on other pending or subsequently filed derivative suits?  This is a topic that I first discussed a few years back in Delaware Court of Chancery “Overrules” Federal Court.  That post was critical of