Rescission And The California Corporations Code

Yesterday, I wrote about an attempt, albeit unsuccessful, to avoid a forum selection clause by a claim of rescission.  The plaintiffs’ in that case, Hatteras Enterprises, Inc. v. Forsythe Cosmetic Group, Ltd., 2016 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 100352 (July 30, 2016), invoked California Civil Code Section 1691, which specifies how a party may rescind.  The grounds for

California Legislature Mulls Anti-Short Selling Bill

In April, I wrote about a bill, SB 726 (Hueso), that would have added a new section to the Corporate Securities Law banning false statements to government officials for the purpose of manipulating the price of a company’s security by triggering an investigation.  See “Bill Aims To Put The Kibosh On Alleged Hedge Fund Stock

Solon And The California Constitution

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Article IV, Section 8 of the California Constitution requires that to be passed, a bill must first be read: No bill may be passed unless it is read by title on 3 days in each house except that the house may dispense with this requirement by rollcall vote entered in the journal, two thirds of

Does The SEC’s New Form 10-K Rule Create A New Disclosure Standard?

Yesterday, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced that it has adopted an interim final rule that allows Form 10-K filers to provide a summary of business and financial information contained in their annual reports.  The SEC adopted the rule pursuant to Section 72001 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act.  The rule adds a new Item 16 to

Just How Many Errors Can Be Found In The Securities Act?

I’ve recently completed my editing of the annual update to Marsh & Volk’s treatise, Practice Under the California Securities Laws.  One source of frustration has been to account for and explain the numerous technical errors in the securities laws.  When I refer to “errors”, I don’t mean policy decisions with which I disagree.  I mean the

How California Made Mergers Potentially More Difficult

The last two sentences of Section 1101 of the Corporations Code can be an unwonted surprise to some practitioners.  They are intended to ensure fair treatment of shareholders in a merger by imposing two requirements: Each share of the same class or series of any constituent corporation must be treated equally with respect to the distribution of

Bill Aims To Put The Kibosh On Alleged Hedge Fund Stock Price Manipulation

The California Corporate Securities Law has long declared a number of manipulative devices to be unlawful.  See Cal. Corp. Code § 25400.  Now, a California legislator wants to add to the list.  As amended last week, SB 726 (Hueso) would insert a new Section 25401.2 to the Corporations Code declaring: It is unlawful for any person, directly or indirectly,

Does Anyone Remember Y2K – California Does!

In the closing years of the last millennium, many were concerned about the “Year 2000 Problem” (aka Y2K).  According to this Securities and Exchange Commission interpretive release: The “Year 2000 problem” arose because many existing computer programs use only the last two digits to refer to a year. Therefore, these computer programs do not properly

Legislature Tries Again To Put Citizens United On California Ballot

Nearly two years ago, I wrote that the California Supreme Court had blocked an effort to include an advisory vote in the statewide ballot.  Proposition 49 asked whether the United States Congress and California Legislature should approve an amendment to the U.S. Constitution overturning the United States Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 130 S.

Is The SEC On Schedule To Violate Another Law?

Last December, President Obama signed into law the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (aka the “FAST Act“).  Buried in the FAST Act were several provisions intended to lighten the load of Securities and Exchange Commission compliance.  Section 72001 requires the SEC to issue regulations to permit issuers to submit a summary page on Form 10–K (17