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CALIFORNIA CORPORATE & SECURITIES LAW

California Securities Law Claims Founder On Personal Jurisdiction

Establishing personal jurisdiction may seem mundane, but without it a plaintiff may soon find itself out of court, as did the plaintiff in Marshall v. Galvanoni, 2017 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 185530. In Marshall, the plaintiff sued a half dozen companies and four individuals over failed investments.  Among other things, the plaintiff alleged violations of California…

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Judge Rules Internal Affairs Doctrine Governs California Insider Trading Statute

As I have mentioned on numerous occasions, California has its own insider trading statute – California Corporations Code Section 25402.  The statute is included in the California Corporate Securities Law of 1968.  In general, the jurisdiction of organization of an issuer is irrelevant to the application of the CSL.  Thus, in most instances, the operative issue will…

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Corp Fin’s New Rule 701 C&DI And California’s Compensation Plan Exemption

Yesterday, Broc Romanek reported that Corp Fin has published a new C&DI addressing the permissibility of electronic delivery of disclosures under Rule 701(e).  Readers will recall that Rule 701 is an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act for offer and sales of securities pursuant to compensatory benefit plans and contracts.  The rule is…

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What’s The Plural Of Condominium?

Wednesday’s post was entitled “Condominiums And The California Corporate Securities Law“.  Today’s post concerns whether I used the proper plural form of “condominium”. “Condominium” is derived from the Latin words, cum and dominium.  Cum means with or together and dominium means right of ownership.  Dominium is a neuter noun in the Latin Second Declension, meaning that its plural form is formed by…

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Promoters And California’s Limited Offering Exemption

I was admitted to the bar the same year that the legislature completed its parturition of a new limited offering exemption under the Corporate Securities Law of 1968 – California Corporations Code Section 25102(f).  AB 1518, Cal. Stats. 1981, ch. 1120.  Section 25102(f) exempts the offer and sale of securities from the issuer qualification requirement established by…

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Condominiums And The California Corporate Securities Law

Some four years ago, I wrote about the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals’ holding in Salameh v. Tarsadia Hotel, 726 F.3d 1124 (9th Cir. 2013).  For those readers who don’t remember the post or the case, the Court of Appeals held that the plaintiffs had failed to allege the sale of a security under federal or California…

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What Kind Of California Corporation Must Include A Salary Limitation In Its Articles Or Bylaws?

I suspect that at least a few California corporate lawyers are unaware of a provision in the California Corporations Code requiring the articles or bylaws of certain corporations to contain a limitation on the salaries paid to the persons operating or employed by the corporation, including officers and directors.  If you are guessing that this provision is included…

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Binary Options And Securities Regulation

Recently, the North American Securities Administrators Association (NASAA) updated and expanded its 2015 advisory warning investors about online binary option schemes.  NASAA offers the following explanation of “binary options”: A binary option is a type of all-or-nothing investment contract, similar to placing a bet. Like the flip of a coin, there are only two possible outcomes: heads…

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Are Limited Liability Companies “Persons”?

Limited liability companies did not exist when Congress enacted the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.  Therefore, it should be no surprise that as originally enacted these acts did not mention LLCs.  Congress has since amended both acts and references to LLCs can now be found in both acts.  Section…

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Something Appears To Be Awry With California’s Insider Trading Statute

I trust that by now most quotidian readers of this blog should be familiar with Corporations Code Section 25402 which declares insider trading to be unlawful.  Although the statute has been on the books since the enactment of the Corporate Securities Law of 1968, it doesn’t make a great deal of sense.  Here’s the unabridged text of the statute: It is…

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