Do Public Pension Funds Breach Their Fiduciary Duties By Pursuing Social Issue Proposals?

Yesterday, UCLA Law School Professor Stephen Bainbridge noted the publication of a recent study that reaches some devastating conclusions for public pension funds.  The study by Professor Tracie Woidtke at the University of Tennessee found that “public pension funds’ ownership is associated with lower firm value”.  To make matters even worse, Professor Woidtke found: Social-issue

NASAA Mistakes The Principal

I have frequently commented on the fact that many so-called “investor protections” have the unintended consequence of increasing the risk of investor losses.  One example is limitations on resales.  An illiquid security presents greater risk than a liquid security.  Investors understand this and will apply an illiquidity discount to the price of a security.  In this

Proposed Initiative Seeks Vote On California Nationhood

Earlier this month, California’s Secretary of State announced that the proponent of a California nationhood proposal may circulate the initiative for signature.  The proponent must secure the signatures of 365,880 registered voters (five percent of the total votes cast for governor in the November 2014 general election) in order to qualify the initiative for the November 2016

When Is Medical Information Considered Sensitive?

As discussed in yesterday’s post, the Securities and Exchange Commission has proposed that persons involved in administrative proceedings be required to submit all documents and other items electronically.  Under the SEC’s proposal, parties would be required to omit “sensitive health information” that is identifiable by individual.  The Privacy Act of 1974, however, prohibits agencies from disclosing information that

SEC Proposes “A Clearly Unwarranted Invasion of Personal Privacy”

Last week, the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed that persons involved in administrative proceedings be required to submit all documents and other items electronically.  The SEC is proposing these rules as part of its effort to create a comprehensive Internet-based electronic system that would, among other things, allow for the electronic filing and service of documents in

The Delaware Court Of Chancery’s Not So Exclusive Jurisdiction

Section 145(k) of the Delaware General Corporation Law is quite clear and emphatic about which court may hear actions for indemnification or advancement of expenses: The Court of Chancery is hereby vested with exclusive jurisdiction to hear and determine all actions for advancement of expenses or indemnification brought under this section or under any bylaw,

Where In The World Is An Issuer’s Home Country?

The Securities and Exchange Commission’s proposed rules setting listing standards for recovery of erroneously awarded compensation would allow exchanges to permit foreign private issuers to forgo recovery as impracticable if the recovery of erroneously awarded compensation pursuant to Section 10D would violate the home country’s laws so long as certain other conditions are satisfied.  Although the

Capturing The SEC

Suppose you are selling a service with some success.  You want to increase sales, but how?  You could promote the value of your services, but some may disagree and others may be indifferent.  A more certain solution would be to get the government to mandate that everyone buy your services.  In 1971, future Nobel Laureate

California Judge Sides With Congress and Fifth Circuit In Whistleblower Split

Sean McKessy, Chief, Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of the Whistleblower, Division of Enforcement discussed a recent split between the circuits this webcast broadcast last Thursday by  The split concerns whether the Dodd-Frank Act prohibits employer retaliation only against “whistleblowers”, who are defined as: . . . any individual who provides, or 2 or more individuals acting jointly who provide,

Just When Does That Law Take Effect?

The California legislature sits in a two-year session known as a biennium.  The current session is the 2015-2016 session.  The first year of the session ended on September 11, 2015.  That was the last day for the legislature to pass bills.  Joint Rule 61(a)(14). The legislature’s passage of a bill does not necessarily mean that